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Answers from vets about your dog:

The German Pinscher

Posted March 07, 2014 in Dog Breeds

Background
The German Pinscher originated in Germany where he was closely associated with the Standard Schnauzer. He was involved with the development of the DobermanMiniature Pinscher and other Pinscher types. The German Pinscher was depicted in dog books that date back to 1884 but was officially recognized in Germany in 1879. Pinchers were used to hunt vermin and protect the home and their family. 

During World War I and World War II, when provisions were running low, the breed came very close to extinction. Werner Jung saved the Pinscher when he travelled throughout Germany in 1958 seeking about Pinschers to revive the breed.

The German Pinscher was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 2003.

Sizing up

  • Weight: 25 to 45 lbs.
  • Height: 17 to 20 inches
  • Coat: Short, sleek
  • Color: Black and rust, fawn, red, and blue and tan
  • Life expectancy: 12 to 14 years

What’s the German Pinscher like?
The German Pinscher is highly energetic and exuberant. He requires a lot of exercise. He can adapt to city life or country life, but he does need daily exercise. He has strong guarding instincts and is good with kids but potentially overprotective of them.

The German Pinscher is a highly intelligent, a quick learner, and does not like repetition during training. He has a strong will and will dominate a meek trainer. Early and consistent training is a must for this breed. It’s important that you be firm and consistent or he will get the upper hand. 

This breed will warn you if a visitor is at the door.

Grooming your German Pinscher is very easy. He’ll need a brushing about once a week and a bath every three months.

Health
The German Pinscher is generally a healthy breed but watch for any of the following:

Takeaway points
The German Pinscher is extremely easy to groom.
The German Pinscher is an excellent watch dog.
The German Pinscher needs strict, early training.

If you have any questions or concerns, you should always visit or call your veterinarian -- they are your best resource to ensure the health and well-being of your pets.

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Tori has more than 2 years of experience in the pet health industry and is junior editor of IDEXX’s Pet Health Network team.